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2017 Cabernet Sauvignon Gran Riserva
$31.95 | 750mL
A.Y. Jackson (1882-1974)
Magnotta Enotrium Gran Riserva VQA
Enotrium is the best and most impressive red wine we produce. To communicate our pride in creating the first Amarone-style VQA wine in Canada, we wanted an art piece that was truly Canadian and renowned. We saved A.Y. Jackson's exceptional piece especially for this special moment. - RM
Alexander Young Jackson, a founding and leading member of the Group of Seven, was recognized during his lifetime for his contribution to the development of art in Canada. He travelled widely and painted full-time, primarily landscapes. A native of Montreal, Jackson studied with William Brymner at the Art Association of Montreal, at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1906, and with Jean-Paul Laurens at the Académie Julien, Paris, in 1907. He painted in Europe frequently between 1906 and 1912. It was his painting The Edge of the Maple Wood (1910) that brought him to the attention of J.E.H. MacDonald and, when it was bought by Lawren Harris, Jackson visited Toronto and met other members of the future Group of Seven. Jackson's father, an unsuccessful businessman, abandoned his family in 1891, and Jackson worked from the age of twelve at a Montreal lithography company. Having moved to Toronto, in 1914, he shared a studio with Tom Thomson and painted in Algonquin Park, producing The Red Maple that same year. During the First World War he joined the infantry, serving as a war artist in 1917-19. He exhibited with the Group of Seven from 1920 and played a key role in bringing the artists of Montreal and Toronto together. Incapacitated in 1968 by a stroke, he moved to Kleinburg, Ontario, and lived there at the McMichael Collection from 1969. He passed away on April 5, 1974 and was put to rest at a small cemetery on the McMichael property. Source: National Gallery of Canada